Stabbed Panda Presents: Band Of Brothers

Stabbed Panda Presents: Band Of Brothers E.P Review Liam chats with Anglo-French indie-rockers Band Of Brothers.

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E.P. Review by Jack Gunner

While the first association for some of the term, "Band of Brothers", will be the grimy khaki of the Emmy winning, Spielberg helmed World War II mini-series of 2001, Shakespeare nerds will know it from its original context – the ending of the renowned St Crispin’s Day Speech from the Bards Henry V, as the warrior king with the dismal bowl-cut rallies his soldiers for one final push at the Battle of Agincourt in 1415.

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Opener Blades of Glory is a 90’s-Britpoppy – there’s notes of Albarn to the vocals - anthemic number with a bouncy intro that’s part Holloways, part Levellers which leads into a more subdued verse and a power-house, feel-good, chorus that kicks the EP off in great style.

Bluesy Steeve takes the journey in indie time-travel back a little further, hinged on a subtle, constant bass line interspersed with some Hendrix style guitar riffs and moments of a Clash-esque sound in the chorus, it’s a real indie-disco song, that will undoubtedly form a cornerstone of the boy’s live shows.

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September Sun is a very short-and-sweet acoustic number which provides a head-turning change in tone from the other tracks, but that is rarely a bad thing. The lyrics, somewhat sentimental and poetic, might come across as borderline schmaltzy to some, but the simplicity and the repetition of lines such as, ‘long are the winter nights’ manage to hit the right notes, reminiscent even of some of the Frost poems about nature. That’s the last literary reference in this review of a rock album. I swear.

What’s the Game? brings the listener back to speed with an ever-so-slightly Libertines-esque, punk-lite track that, unlike the others on the disc runs on for a bit, allowing the musicianship to breathe a bit – the drums are at their best here, starting with a simple rhythmic build-up before exploding in pop-punk flurries, while Lawrence, (vocals), unveils his inner Billie Joe Armstrong on the rousing, emotive chorus.

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Young Wings closes off the disc with a folk-y, summer-y guitar backdrop that shows off another side to the bands tempo – it’s the kind of song that would feel right at home at a summer festival played to an evening daisy chain crowd, and it’s a decent listen and adequate disc-closer even here in rainy Yorkshire, though let down ever so slightly by a bland chorus.

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Band of Brothers, like the comrades of their namesake, are old-school in their sound and their vibe, sounding less like a band of the current nerd-rock-fused-with-dance scene that dominates modern indie, and more like a fun, drink-and-dance-along pop-rock act, which carves them out a great space in the market. With a decent range for a five-track that shows talented craftsmanship, good energy and the potential for expansion, both sides of the Channel could do with standing up and taking note of them.

(8.5/10) Jack Gunner